Whole Grain Waffles

WP_20140128_17_58_53_Pro (1)

My kids love waffles – what’s not to love? I get to make a weeks worth of school breakfasts in less than an hour, and the kids get another maple syrup delivery system 😉 I I like to use wheat pastry flour because it’s mild enough that the kids don’t mind, and I like that I can sneak a little fiber into breakfast. This batch makes about 10 waffles, most of which get cooled, divided, bagged and frozen. Warm them up in a 350 degree oven for about 10 minutes, or mere seconds in your microwave. Thanks for reading, enjoy!

Whole Wheat Waffles – adapted from Cookie and Kate

  • 1 cup whole wheat pastry flour
  • 1 cup whole wheat flour (you can also use spelt, rye, cornmeal or buckwheat)
  • 1½ teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 2 cups buttermilk (make your own: add 2 tablespoons of vinegar or lemon juice to 2 cups milk, and let sit for 5 minutes)
  • 3 eggs
  • 1 tablespoon maple syrup (or honey)
  • ¼ cup (1/2 stick) butter (original recipe called for one full stick of butter)
  • ½ teaspoon cinnamon
  • ½ teaspoon vanilla extract
Directions –
  1. Preheat your oven to 200 degrees and heat up your waffle iron.
  2. Mix the dry ingredients (flours, baking powder, baking soda, and salt) in a large mixing bowl.
  3. In a large measuring cup, whisk together the buttermilk, eggs and syrup or honey.
  4. Pour the liquid ingredients into the dry ingredients. Stir just until they are mixed.
  5. Add the melted butter and mix well.
  6. Pour batter into your waffle iron until the butter reaches the edges of the iron. Cook until crisp and golden.
  7. Place each waffle on a rack in the oven (in a single layer) to keep them warm until you’re ready to serve. Five minutes in the oven may actually help them get a little crispier.
Advertisements

Buttermilk Oatmeal Bread

bread1

I love making bread – actually, I love that I know how to, and that it’s been three years since I tried it out for the first time. I remember feeling so intimidated by yeast (silly now that I think about it), but I’m so glad I got over that 🙂 When I see my daughter smiling as she’s smelling fresh from the oven bread, I know it’s something that she will always love and remember about me. I can’t wait to pass on what I have learned to her, so she can pass her knowledge onto someone else.

I had a homemade batch of buttermilk that I needed to use up, plus we were almost out of sandwich bread. Thankfully Pinterest came to my rescue again! I doubled this recipe  and my sweetener of choice was raw honey. When I took it out of the oven, I smelled the honey and oats – so perfect! It has a great slightly chewy bite and flavor is mild enough for sweet or savory toppings. Thanks for reading, enjoy!

bread

Buttermilk Oatmeal Bread – adapted from Buttered Side Up

  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1 cup buttermilk
  • 1 tablespoon instant yeast
  • 1/4 cup sugar, maple syrup or honey, divided
  • 1/4 cup butter, melted and cooled
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour (250 grams)
  • 2 cups whole wheat flour (262 grams)
  • 1/2 cup old-fashioned rolled oats
  • 2 teaspoons sea salt

Directions:

1) Gently warm the buttermilk in a 4 cup or larger measuring cup. Add the oats, hot water, melted butter, sweetener and salt. Stir to combine and set aside until it cools slightly.
2) In a standing mixer bowl, combine the flours, (I always hold back at least 1/2 cup). Add the yeast, and buttermilk mixture and mix to combine.
3) Using the dough hook, knead until smooth and elastic, about 5-7minutes. Add flour as necessary. Return to mixing bowl and let rise until doubled, about 1-2 hours, depending on how warm your house is.
4) Form risen dough into loaves, buns or whatever shape you wish. Place in greased pans (if making a loaf use a 9×5-inch pan) and let rise until nearly doubled, about 1 more hour.
5) During the last 15 minutes of rising, preheat your oven to 350, bake loaves for 35 -40 minutes or until the internal temp is 190 degrees. Remove from pan and allow to cool completely on a wire rack before slicing.

Pretzel Dogs

These are seriously good! My sister made these for our 4th of July party this summer and they were a big hit with kids and adults alike. In an effort to redeem these nutritionally (every little bit helps), I used half white whole wheat and half all-purpose flour for these. Also, the hot dogs are uncured, grass-fed beef…yes, I am a food snob! 😉

This dough is so easy to work with and easily rolled, and shaped without that annoying snap-back of some other doughs I have worked with. Be careful when you add the baking soda to your pot of boiling water, as it will boil more aggressively. Use a slotted spoon to carefully add the dogs to the pot and, again watch for the crazy boiling water!  We’re going to experiment with these in the kid’s lunch for school tomorrow – here’s hoping for no soggy pretzel dogs! 😉

UPDATE: The kids took one each in their lunch yesterday, and they didn’t become soggy! It helps that I didn’t refrigerate the leftovers, and I ate some for lunch too and they still tasted great. I’m really happy with these, and no one could tell that they’re nearly half whole wheat! Thanks for reading, enjoy!

Pretzel Dogs – adapted from Fake Ginger

  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1½ cups warm water
  • 2 teaspoons kosher salt
  • 1 package dry active yeast
  • 2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour (312 grams)
  • 2 cups white whole wheat flour (240 grams)
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted and cooled
  • 10 cups water
  • ⅔ cup baking soda
  • 1 large egg yolk, beaten with 1 tablespoon water
  • Pretzel salt (or kosher salt), for topping
  • 8 hot dogs, cut in half (*I used these*)

Directions:
Combine the warm water, sugar and kosher salt in the bowl of a stand mixer and sprinkle the yeast on top. Let the mixture sit for about 5 minutes, until the yeast is foamy and begins to smell of yeast.
Add the flour and butter to the yeast mixture. Attach the dough hook to the stand mixer and, on medium-low speed, combine the mixture until the dough pulls away from the sides of the bowl and appears shiny, roughly 4 to 5 minutes.
Spray a large bowl with non-stick spray (or lightly grease with vegetable oil) and place dough in greased bowl. Cover with plastic wrap. Place bowl in a warm area and let dough rise for about 1 hour, or until doubled in size.
Preheat oven to 450 degrees. Line two cookie sheets with parchment paper. Spray parchment paper with non-stick spray. Set aside.
In a large pot, bring the 10 cups of water and the baking soda to a roiling boil.
Place the dough on a greased surface, and divide into 16 equal pieces. Roll each piece into a long rope, roughly 12 inches long. Carefully wrap each piece around a half hot dog. Pinch the ends together to seal the dough.
Boil the shaped pretzels and pretzel dogs, one at a time, in the baking soda water for 30 seconds each. Using a slotted spatula, remove each pretzel dog from the water and place it on a drying rack to allow any extra baking soda mixture to drip off.
Place the boiled pretzel dogs back on a parchment lined baking sheets.
Brush with beaten egg yolk and sprinkle with pretzel or kosher salt.
Bake until golden brown, roughly 14 to 15 minutes. Transfer pretzel dogs to a cooling rack for a few minutes before serving. Serve with a variety of mustards.

Whole Wheat Sandwich Bread

Yes, it came out a little – okay, a lot wonky…but I have issues with braids on top of loaves. I didn’t tuck the braid underneath the loaf, and this is what happens. I should know by now that patience and reading through the full recipe is rewarded. Don’t be like me! 😉 However, in the end what the food looks like isn’t nearly as important as how it tastes.

Verdict: S calls this “cloud bread” and didn’t seem to mind that this is wheatier than other loaves I usually make. This bread tastes great and isn’t bitter from all the wheat flour. It’s also surprisingly soft and squishy, but not so soft that it fell apart while eating my sandwich. Thanks for reading, enjoy!

Whole Wheat Bread – adapted from My Kitchen Addiction

  • 2 tablespoons orange juice
  • 1 cup lukewarm water
  • 2 1/2 teaspoons instant yeast (or one packet)
  • 3 tablespoons granulated sugar
  • 1/2 cup plain Greek yogurt
  • 1/4 cup canola oil
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup bread flour (King Arthur)
  • 3+ cups white whole wheat flour (King Arthur)

In a large mixing bowl, combine the water and the orange juice.  Sprinkle with the yeast and granulated sugar, and stir to dissolve.  Add the yogurt, canola oil, salt, and cup of bread flour.  Use a wooden spoon to mix, beating vigorously to start to develop the gluten in the bread flour.  Gradually, add the whole wheat flour, mixing with the wooden spoon until the dough pulls away from the sides of the bowl to form a ball. At that point, turn the dough out onto a clean, floured surface, and knead until you have a smooth dough (about 6-8 minutes). The amount of whole wheat flour needed will vary on the humidity and other factors.  Add just enough flour to keep the dough from sticking to your hands as you knead.

Return the dough to a lightly greased bowl, cover (with plastic wrap or a damp towel), and let rise until the dough has doubled (about an hour or two). It has risen sufficiently when the imprint of your fingers remains and the dough doesn’t spring back up.

Punch down the dough and form it into the shape of a loaf.  If you prefer, you can make a braid-topped loaf (like the one in my pictures) by reserving 1/3 of the dough, dividing it into three long strands, and creating a braid.  Place the braid on top of the loaf, tucking in the ends.  Place the shaped loaf into a greased loaf pan, cover, and let rise for an additional hour.

Preheat the oven to 350°F.  Bake the bread uncovered for 15 minutes, then cover with aluminum foil (to prevent over-browning on the top) and bake for an additional 20 – 25 minutes.  The internal temperature of the bread should be 190°F when the bread is done. Let the bread rest in the pan for a minute or two before transferring it to a wire rack to cool.  Cool for at least 30 minutes before slicing.

Rosemary Olive Oil Potato Bread

Quick Post: This experiment was inspired my husband who told me he likes potato bread. I haven’t bought it in years, but I decided to search for potato bread recipes. I always like to try new breads and this one seemed easy enough. I like the addition of rosemary, and thought this would be a great bread to go with steak or chicken. These kind of loaves are great because they have that “wow” factor. It looks and sounds fancy, but it isn’t at all difficult to make. The texture is soft, with a dense crumb and a chewy crust – perfect for sopping up juices on your plate or bowl of soup. Thanks for reading, enjoy!
Rosemary Olive Oil Potato Bread – adapted from What Megan’s Making
  • 1 cup cold, roasted mashed up potatoes, skins removed (*Can also use mashed potato flakes to make 1 cup of mashed potatoes)
  • 4 Tbsp olive oil
  • 1 envelope (1/4 oz) active dry yeast
  • 1 cup warm water
  • 3 cups white flour
  • 1 cup whole wheat flour
  • 2 tsp salt
  • 2 tsp fresh rosemary, finely chopped

Directions:

In a small bowl mix together the mashed potatoes and olive oil. Set aside.

In a large bowl, mix the warm water with the yeast and let sit for 5 minutes, or until bubbly. Add the flour, whole wheat flour, salt, rosemary, and potato/oil mixture and mix together. Add more water or flour as needed to form a soft dough. Turn the dough out onto a floured surface and knead for 8-10 minutes, or until smooth and elastic. Clean out the mixing bowl and lightly spray with cooking spray. Place dough in the bowl and cover with a dishtowel. Let rise 1 hour, or until doubled in size.

Turn risen dough out onto a floured surface and knead a few times. Flatten the dough with your hands and fold up like business letter. (You could also separate the dough into two smaller loaves at this point.)Turn it seam side down, form into a plump oval shape, and place on a lined baking sheet. Sprinkle the top with flour, cover with a towel and let rise for 30 minutes, or until doubled in size.

Preheat the oven to 400. Using a sharp knife make 3-4 diagonal slits in the bread to make a criss-cross pattern. Bake for 30-35 minutes or until golden brown and the loaf sounds hollow when you tap on it. Transfer to a wire rack to cool. Let cool completely before slicing.

Honey Oat Bread

Another day, another bread recipe! This one has lot of honey in it, but it’s not too sweet. I ate the small slice of heel (I affectionately call “butt bread”, we fight over that piece around here), and it was so yummy. I have made otherhoney-oatbreads before, but the honey really shines through in this loaf. I like that warm honey is applied over top the risen loaf and sprinkled with oats. It leaves the top sweet and nutty tasting, but this bread didn’t over power the sandwiches I made. As you can imagine, when toasted the flavors are turned up more. Overall, I’m pleased with this new recipe and I’m sure I’ll make it again and again. Thanks for reading, enjoy!

Honey Oat Bread – adapted from Bakingdom

**notes for doubling**

    • 2 cups bread flour  (**508 grams **)
    • 1 cup white whole wheat flour  (** 240 grams**)
    • 3/4 cups old fashioned oats  (**135 grams**)
    • 2 1/4 teaspoons instant yeast (**two packages worth**)
    • 1 1/2 teaspoons salt  (**1 TBSP**)
    • 1 cup milk  (**2 cups**)
    • 1/4 cup lukewarm water  (**1/2 cup**)
    • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter  (**4 TBSP**)
    • 1/4 cup honey  (**1/2 cup**)

For Topping

  • 1 1/2 to 2 tablespoons honey, warmed
  • 1 1/2 to 2 tablespoons oats
Directions –

In a large bowl, or the bowl of a standing mixer, combine the flour, oats, yeast, and salt.

In a small bowl, or two cup measuring cup, warm the milk so that it’s hot enough to melt the butter, but not boiling. Add the butter, stirring until melted, then stir in the water and honey.

Pour the milk mixture into the flour mixture, mixing until it just comes together to form a dough. Knead for 10 minutes, until the dough is smooth and elastic. If the dough is still very wet and sticky after 5 minutes of kneading, add more flour, 1 tablespoon at a time, until the dough is barely tacky. If the dough is too dry, add water, 1 teaspoon at a time, to soften it up.

Place the dough in a lightly oiled bowl, cover, and allow to rise until doubled, about 1 to 1 1/2 hours.

Once doubled, place the dough on a clean, dry work surface. If the dough is too sticky, lightly flour the surface before continuing. With your fingers, flatten the dough into a 9 by 12-inch rectangle. Tightly roll the dough, tucking the ends as needed, into a loaf. Place the shaped dough into a 9×5-inch loaf pan, cover with plastic wrap, and allow to rise until doubled, about 1 to 1 1/2 hours.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Place an empty loaf pan on the bottom rack of the oven and bring 2 cups of water to a boil.

When the loaf is doubled again, brush the top with the warmed honey and sprinkle with the oats.

Place the bread in the oven and pour the boiling water into the empty loaf pan on the bottom rack of the oven. Bake for 40 to 50 minutes, until the bread is deep golden brown and the internal temperature is about 190 degrees.

Transfer to a wire cooling rack and allow to cool completely before serving.