Flour Tortillas

Hallelujah! I found the best, most authentic tasting, not to mention easiest flour tortilla recipe out there. What makes it even more amazing is that the dough is very forgiving and really easy to roll out. Recipes that call for milk, baking powder or oil cannot come close to the awesomeness of shortening (or lard), sorry! I used this non- hydrogenated vegetable shortening instead of Crisco.

Last night I made chimichangas, which my family loved – but the star of the meal was definitely the tortillas. The batch I made didn’t last long – in fact, my son requested a wrap for his lunch using the last one 😉 I made another batch today that is half white whole wheat, half all-purpose flour in an attempt to redeem these a little. They are still as pliable and soft as the all white flour tortillas and just as tasty! Thanks for reading, enjoy! 🙂

Flour Tortillas – adapted from The Urban Spork

  • 2  3/4 cups all-purpose flour, plus a little extra for rolling the tortillas
  • 5 tablespoons vegetable shortening, lard or 2 1/2 tablespoons of each (for the most authentic version)
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 3/4 cup very warm tap water

Directions

Combine the flour and shortening in a large mixing bowl and work the shortening into the flour with your fingers until completely incorporated.  If this isn’t done thoroughly (until no particles of shortening remain visible), the tortillas will have an irregular texture.  Dissolve the salt in the water and pour about 2/3 cup over the dry ingredients and immediately work it in with a fork; the dough will be in large clumps.  If all the dry ingredients haven’t been dampened, add the rest of the liquid (plus a little more, if necessary).  Scoop the dough onto your work surface and knead until smooth.  It should be a medium-stiff consistency – not firm, but not quite as soft as most bread dough either.

Divide the dough into 12 portions and roll each into a ball.  Set them on a plate, cover with plastic wrap and let rest for at least 30 minutes – this makes the dough easier to roll.

Heat an ungreased griddle or heavy skillet over medium to medium-high heat.

Flatten a ball of dough, flour it, then roll forward and back across it; rotate a sixth of a turn and roll forward and back again; continue rotating and rolling until you reach a 7-inch circle, lightly flouring the tortilla and work surface from time to time.

Lay the tortilla on the hot griddle (you should hear a faint sizzle and see an almost immediate bubbling across the surface).  After 30 to 45 seconds, when there are browned splotches underneath, flip it over.  Bake 30 to 45 seconds more, until the other side is browned; don’t overbake the tortilla or it will become crisp.  Remove and wrap in a cloth napkin placed in a tortilla warmer.  Roll and griddle-bake the remaining tortillas in the same manner – stack them one on top of the other in the warmer.

Whole Wheat Bread with Spelt Flour

This bread tastes like whole wheat bread is supposed to taste! I substituted more spelt flour for the white flour, figuring the more whole grain the better. My substitution worked really well and I used bread flour instead of all-purpose to make up for the gluten that it might need because of my substitution. Spelt flour has less gluten and requires less water than wheat flour, and you need to be careful not to over knead the dough or it can create a crumbly finished loaf. Thanks for reading, enjoy!
Whole Wheat Bread – adapted from Musings of a Housewife
  • 6 cups white whole wheat flour (720 grams)
  • 2/3 cup honey
  • 1/2 cup coconut oil or butter, melted
  • 2 tablespoon salt
  • 3 tablespoons active dry yeast
  • 4-1/2 cups water
  • 2 cups Spelt or white flour (I used 3.5 cups or 402 grams)
  • 4 to 6 cups all-purpose flour (I used 3-3.5 cups or 381-444 grams)

Directions:

  1. Combine coconut oil, honey and 4-1/2 cups water in a small saucepan. Heat over low heat JUST until the oil is melted. It should be about 120 degrees so as to not kill the yeast.
  2. Place whole wheat flour, yeast and salt in a large mixing bowl. With the paddle attachment, mix about 15 seconds on Stir. (This is the mixer I have. It will do 4 loaves at once, but I often end up kneading the last few minutes by hand.)
  3. Continuing on Stir, add warm water mixture to flour mixture. Mix about a minute.
  4. Then with the dough hook in place, add the spelt and all-purpose flour, 1/2 cup at a time, mixing well between each addition.
  5. Mix about 2 minutes, or until dough starts to clean sides of bowl, adding flour as necessary.
  6. Knead on Speed 2 about 2 minutes longer.
  7. Place dough in greased bowl, and turn greased side up.
  8. Cover and let rise in warm place 40 to 60 minutes or until double. Dough is ready if indentation remains when touched.
  9. Form your loaves and place them in 8×4 loaf pans to rise for about an hour.
  10. When they look the right size, bake for 30 – 40 minutes in a preheated 350-degree oven, or until the internal temp is 190 degrees.
  11. Remove immediately to a cooking rack, brush tops with butter (optional), and try to wait a few hours before cutting into one.

Whole Wheat Sandwich Bread

Yes, it came out a little – okay, a lot wonky…but I have issues with braids on top of loaves. I didn’t tuck the braid underneath the loaf, and this is what happens. I should know by now that patience and reading through the full recipe is rewarded. Don’t be like me! 😉 However, in the end what the food looks like isn’t nearly as important as how it tastes.

Verdict: S calls this “cloud bread” and didn’t seem to mind that this is wheatier than other loaves I usually make. This bread tastes great and isn’t bitter from all the wheat flour. It’s also surprisingly soft and squishy, but not so soft that it fell apart while eating my sandwich. Thanks for reading, enjoy!

Whole Wheat Bread – adapted from My Kitchen Addiction

  • 2 tablespoons orange juice
  • 1 cup lukewarm water
  • 2 1/2 teaspoons instant yeast (or one packet)
  • 3 tablespoons granulated sugar
  • 1/2 cup plain Greek yogurt
  • 1/4 cup canola oil
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup bread flour (King Arthur)
  • 3+ cups white whole wheat flour (King Arthur)

In a large mixing bowl, combine the water and the orange juice.  Sprinkle with the yeast and granulated sugar, and stir to dissolve.  Add the yogurt, canola oil, salt, and cup of bread flour.  Use a wooden spoon to mix, beating vigorously to start to develop the gluten in the bread flour.  Gradually, add the whole wheat flour, mixing with the wooden spoon until the dough pulls away from the sides of the bowl to form a ball. At that point, turn the dough out onto a clean, floured surface, and knead until you have a smooth dough (about 6-8 minutes). The amount of whole wheat flour needed will vary on the humidity and other factors.  Add just enough flour to keep the dough from sticking to your hands as you knead.

Return the dough to a lightly greased bowl, cover (with plastic wrap or a damp towel), and let rise until the dough has doubled (about an hour or two). It has risen sufficiently when the imprint of your fingers remains and the dough doesn’t spring back up.

Punch down the dough and form it into the shape of a loaf.  If you prefer, you can make a braid-topped loaf (like the one in my pictures) by reserving 1/3 of the dough, dividing it into three long strands, and creating a braid.  Place the braid on top of the loaf, tucking in the ends.  Place the shaped loaf into a greased loaf pan, cover, and let rise for an additional hour.

Preheat the oven to 350°F.  Bake the bread uncovered for 15 minutes, then cover with aluminum foil (to prevent over-browning on the top) and bake for an additional 20 – 25 minutes.  The internal temperature of the bread should be 190°F when the bread is done. Let the bread rest in the pan for a minute or two before transferring it to a wire rack to cool.  Cool for at least 30 minutes before slicing.