Pita Chips

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It was Mediterranean night for the group this week, (and because I am a food snob) I knew I would need to make pita chips to go with my fave tzatziki sauce. After a quick search, I stumbled upon this simple recipe. Caution: These are highly addictive! the kids and I eat them plain – they are perfectly crunchy, salty and a little savory 🙂 I think they’ll be a great addition to their school lunches instead of pretzels or chips. Thanks for reading, enjoy!

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Pita Chips – adapted from King Arthur Flour

  • 1 3/4 cups white whole wheat flour
  • 1 1/2 cups AP flour
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • 1 tsp sugar
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons instant yeast
  • 1 1/4 cups lukewarm water
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil

Topping –

  • 1/3 cup olive oil
  • sea salt to taste

1) Mix and knead the dough ingredients together to make a soft, smooth dough.

2) Place the dough in a lightly greased bowl, cover, and let rise for 60 to 90 minutes, until just about doubled in bulk.

3) Preheat the oven to 450°F, with a pizza stone on the bottom rack. If you don’t have a pizza stone, see tips, below.

4) Gently deflate the dough, and divide it into 8 pieces.

5) Shape each into a ball, cover, and let rest for 10 minutes.

6) Working with two pieces of dough at a time, roll each into a 6″ circle. Transfer them to the hot stone.

7) Bake for 4 minutes, until puffy. Turn them over, and bake for an additional minute. Remove from the oven, and place on a rack to cool.

8) Repeat with the remaining pieces of dough.

9) Once the pitas are cool, carefully separate the two sides of each to make 16 thin rounds.

10) Brush rounds with oil and sprinkle with sea salt.

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11) Cut each round into 8 wedges. Divide the wedges between two parchment-lined baking sheets.

12) Bake the chips in a preheated 350°F oven for 15 to 20 minutes, until crisp; turn the chips over after 10 minutes of baking.

13) Remove chips from the oven, cool completely on the pan, wrap airtight, and store at room temperature.

Whole Wheat Bread with Spelt Flour

This bread tastes like whole wheat bread is supposed to taste! I substituted more spelt flour for the white flour, figuring the more whole grain the better. My substitution worked really well and I used bread flour instead of all-purpose to make up for the gluten that it might need because of my substitution. Spelt flour has less gluten and requires less water than wheat flour, and you need to be careful not to over knead the dough or it can create a crumbly finished loaf. Thanks for reading, enjoy!
Whole Wheat Bread – adapted from Musings of a Housewife
  • 6 cups white whole wheat flour (720 grams)
  • 2/3 cup honey
  • 1/2 cup coconut oil or butter, melted
  • 2 tablespoon salt
  • 3 tablespoons active dry yeast
  • 4-1/2 cups water
  • 2 cups Spelt or white flour (I used 3.5 cups or 402 grams)
  • 4 to 6 cups all-purpose flour (I used 3-3.5 cups or 381-444 grams)

Directions:

  1. Combine coconut oil, honey and 4-1/2 cups water in a small saucepan. Heat over low heat JUST until the oil is melted. It should be about 120 degrees so as to not kill the yeast.
  2. Place whole wheat flour, yeast and salt in a large mixing bowl. With the paddle attachment, mix about 15 seconds on Stir. (This is the mixer I have. It will do 4 loaves at once, but I often end up kneading the last few minutes by hand.)
  3. Continuing on Stir, add warm water mixture to flour mixture. Mix about a minute.
  4. Then with the dough hook in place, add the spelt and all-purpose flour, 1/2 cup at a time, mixing well between each addition.
  5. Mix about 2 minutes, or until dough starts to clean sides of bowl, adding flour as necessary.
  6. Knead on Speed 2 about 2 minutes longer.
  7. Place dough in greased bowl, and turn greased side up.
  8. Cover and let rise in warm place 40 to 60 minutes or until double. Dough is ready if indentation remains when touched.
  9. Form your loaves and place them in 8×4 loaf pans to rise for about an hour.
  10. When they look the right size, bake for 30 – 40 minutes in a preheated 350-degree oven, or until the internal temp is 190 degrees.
  11. Remove immediately to a cooking rack, brush tops with butter (optional), and try to wait a few hours before cutting into one.

Whole Wheat Sandwich Bread

Yes, it came out a little – okay, a lot wonky…but I have issues with braids on top of loaves. I didn’t tuck the braid underneath the loaf, and this is what happens. I should know by now that patience and reading through the full recipe is rewarded. Don’t be like me! 😉 However, in the end what the food looks like isn’t nearly as important as how it tastes.

Verdict: S calls this “cloud bread” and didn’t seem to mind that this is wheatier than other loaves I usually make. This bread tastes great and isn’t bitter from all the wheat flour. It’s also surprisingly soft and squishy, but not so soft that it fell apart while eating my sandwich. Thanks for reading, enjoy!

Whole Wheat Bread – adapted from My Kitchen Addiction

  • 2 tablespoons orange juice
  • 1 cup lukewarm water
  • 2 1/2 teaspoons instant yeast (or one packet)
  • 3 tablespoons granulated sugar
  • 1/2 cup plain Greek yogurt
  • 1/4 cup canola oil
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup bread flour (King Arthur)
  • 3+ cups white whole wheat flour (King Arthur)

In a large mixing bowl, combine the water and the orange juice.  Sprinkle with the yeast and granulated sugar, and stir to dissolve.  Add the yogurt, canola oil, salt, and cup of bread flour.  Use a wooden spoon to mix, beating vigorously to start to develop the gluten in the bread flour.  Gradually, add the whole wheat flour, mixing with the wooden spoon until the dough pulls away from the sides of the bowl to form a ball. At that point, turn the dough out onto a clean, floured surface, and knead until you have a smooth dough (about 6-8 minutes). The amount of whole wheat flour needed will vary on the humidity and other factors.  Add just enough flour to keep the dough from sticking to your hands as you knead.

Return the dough to a lightly greased bowl, cover (with plastic wrap or a damp towel), and let rise until the dough has doubled (about an hour or two). It has risen sufficiently when the imprint of your fingers remains and the dough doesn’t spring back up.

Punch down the dough and form it into the shape of a loaf.  If you prefer, you can make a braid-topped loaf (like the one in my pictures) by reserving 1/3 of the dough, dividing it into three long strands, and creating a braid.  Place the braid on top of the loaf, tucking in the ends.  Place the shaped loaf into a greased loaf pan, cover, and let rise for an additional hour.

Preheat the oven to 350°F.  Bake the bread uncovered for 15 minutes, then cover with aluminum foil (to prevent over-browning on the top) and bake for an additional 20 – 25 minutes.  The internal temperature of the bread should be 190°F when the bread is done. Let the bread rest in the pan for a minute or two before transferring it to a wire rack to cool.  Cool for at least 30 minutes before slicing.

One Loaf Basic Bread and One Cinnamon-Raisin Swirl

I like when recipes offer variations like this one – it’s like two for the price of one 😉  It was just me and the kids this week as M was off checking out an IBM convention for work. When he’s away I like to take advantage of not worrying if he will like something I make or not. See – he doesn’t like onions, bell peppers, mushrooms, mustard or raisins. He says he’s not picky, and believe me I have met some picky eaters – but those foods he refuses are often main components to so many recipes! It really ruins meal planning for me at times. The kids and I love raisins and I don’t often get to make a loaf like this one. Besides, it had been a couple of months since last I made French toast.
These loaves came out nicely with a tight, but not dense crumb – perfect for hearty sandwiches, grilled cheese or toast. I will make this one again with my modifications. I can’t justify using all white flour in any of my loaves, and I find if I substitute one-third of the flour with white whole wheat, my family doesn’t complain 🙂
Walter Sands’ Basic White Bread and Cinnamon-Swirl Variation – adapted from King Arthur Flour
  • 2 cups warm water
  • 2 tablespoons raw sugar
  • 1 packet active dry yeast
  • 1/2 cup Bakes’s Special dry milk (71 grams)
  • 2 tablespoons soft butter
  • 4 cups (500 grams) AP Flour
  • 2 cups (240 grams) white whole wheat flour
  • 2 teaspoons salt

cinnamon-raisin swirl – (I used half this amount)

  • 3 tablespoons butter, melted and cooled
  • 1 cup raisins
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
Directions: 

1) Pour the warm water into a mixing bowl. Add and let dissolve the sugar or honey and then the yeast.

2) When the yeast is bubbling, add the butter, 3 cups of flour, the dry milk, and salt. Mix together.

3) Stir in another 2 1/2 cups of flour, keeping the last 1/2 cup in reserve. Knead the dough for 3 to 4 minutes, until it begins to behave as if it belongs together. Cover and let the dough rest while you clean and grease the mixing bowl.

4) Continue kneading for 3 or 4 more minutes, until the dough feels smooth and springy.

5) Place the bowl in the greased bowl, turn it over to coat both sides, and cover the bowl. Let it rise in a draft-free place until doubled, 1 to 2 hours. Deflate the dough, and divide it in half. For cinnamon-swirl bread, roll each piece of dough into a rough 9″ x 15″ rectangle. Spread each piece with half the melted butter, then sprinkle with half the raisins, sugar, and cinnamon. Starting with a short edge, roll into a cylinder. Place the loaves in the pans, seam-side down, and let rise and bake as directed at right., and place in greased 8 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ pans. Cover with greased plastic wrap and let rise until the dough domes an inch above the rim of the pans.

6) After the dough has been rising for 20 minutes, preheat the oven to 350°F. When the loaves are sufficiently risen, bake for 35 to 40 minutes, or until nicely browned and the center of the loaves reads 190°F when measured with an instant-read thermometer. Remove from the oven and tip the breads out of their pans. Place on a rack to cool completely before slicing.

This is our favorite recipe for custard and I have been using it for years. I have tried others, but this is the best in my opinion. Dry out your bread slices overnight, or spread the pieces on a cooling rack placed on a sheet pan at 350 degrees for 5 minutes. I soaked the raisins in hot water before I put them on the dough, but I didn’t have time to let them drain for very long. That’s why the loaf didn’t stay together at the top. All that steam built up underneath and created a big air bubble all the way through. Thankfully, it tastes better than it looks! Thanks for reading, enjoy 🙂